EPFL is a Switzerland-based technical university and research center. EPFL is focuses on three missions: teaching, research and technology transfer. EPFL works together with an extensive network of partners including other universities and institutes of technology, secondary schools and colleges, industry and economy, political circles and the general public.

EPFL does extensive perovskite R&D work and is responsible for many publications and advancements in the field.

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The latest EPFL perovskite news:

New approach to stabilize perovskite material may yield improved solar cells

An international research team, including scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has found a stable that efficiently creates electricity and could be extremely beneficial for perovskite solar cells.

The researchers show how the material CsPbI3, an inorganic perovskite, has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

Perovskite solar cells' behavior under real-world conditions is tested - in the lab

Researchers at the lab of Anders Hagfeldt at EPFL, working with colleagues at the lab of Michael Grätzel, brought real-world conditions into the controlled environment of the lab. Using data from a weather station near Lausanne (Switzerland), they reproduced the real-world temperature and irradiance profiles from specific days during the course of the year, to test PSCs in real-world conditions.



PSCs tested for real world conditions in the lab image

With this approach, the scientists were able to quantify the energy yield of the devices under realistic conditions. “This is what ultimately counts for the real-world application of solar cells," says Dr. Wolfgang Tress from EPFL.

Collaborative team focuses on MA to better understand perovskite PV stability issues

Researchers from the University of Fribourg and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University in India and Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla in Mexico have revealed new clues about the stability of perovskite thin films and solar cells.

“Our chief aim is to stabilize perovskite solar cells for many years and decades,” explains Michael Saliba, principal investigator at the Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg. “Without long-term stability, any commercialization efforts will fail.”

EPFL researchers develop a new way to achieve to high-performance, stable perovskite solar cells

Some of the key challenges for hybrid organic-inorganic perovskite solar cells are their limited stability, scalability, and molecular level engineering. Researchers at the Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces (LPI) and Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance (LMR) at EPFL show how molecular engineering of multifunctional molecular modulators (MMMs) and using solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to investigate their role in double-cation pure-iodide perovskites can lead to stable, scalable, and efficient perovskite solar cells.

The objective of the team lead by Professor Grätzel (LPI), in collaboration with the group of Professor Lyndon Emsley (LMR) was to tackle the above-mentioned challenges through rational molecular design in conjunction with solid-state NMR, as a unique technique for probing interactions within the perovskite material at the atomic level. The team designed a series of organic molecules equipped with specific functions that act as molecular modulators (MMs), which interact with the perovskite surface through noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding or metal coordination. While hydrogen bonding can affect the electronic quality of the material, coordination to the metal cation sites could ensure suppression of some of the structural defects, such as under-coordinated metal ions.

Research team develops a technique to prolong lifespan of perovskite solar cells

Researchers at Kaunas University of Technology (KTU), Lithuania, along with ones from Vilnius University and the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Lausanne (EPFL), have uncovered one of the possible reasons behind the short lifespan of perovskite solar cells and have offered solutions. The scientists have found that hole transporting materials used in perovskite solar cells are reacting with one of the most popular additives, tert-butylpyridine, which has a negative impact on overall device performance.

Professor Vytautas Getautis from the KTU Faculty of Chemical Technology says that so far, no attention has been paid to the possible interaction between the elements of the solar cell. For the first time, KTU chemists have uncovered the chemical reaction between the components of the hole transporting layer composition – the semiconductor and the additive used to improve the performance of the solar cell.

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