EPFL logo imageEPFL is a Switzerland-based technical university and research center. EPFL is focuses on three missions: teaching, research and technology transfer. EPFL works together with an extensive network of partners including other universities and institutes of technology, secondary schools and colleges, industry and economy, political circles and the general public.

EPFL does extensive perovskite R&D work and is responsible for many publications and advancements in the field.

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The latest EPFL perovskite news:

EPFL team develops deposition method to overcome formamidinium issues

Metal halide perovskites are often made by mixing cations or halides with formamidinium (FAPbI3), to get high power-conversion efficiency in perovskite solar cells. But at the same time, the most stable phase of FAPbI3 is photoinactive, meaning that it does not react to light—the opposite of what a solar power harvester should do. In addition, solar cells made with FAPbI3 show long-term stability issues. Now, researchers led by Michael Grätzel and Anders Hafgeldt at EPFL, have developed a deposition method that overcomes the formamidinium issues while maintaining the high conversion of perovskite solar cells.

In the new method, the materials are first treated with a vapor of methylammonium thiocyanate (MASCN) or formamidinium thiocyanate FASCN. This innovative tweak turns the photoinactive FAPbI3 perovskite films to the desired photosensitive ones.

EPFL team uses perovskites to show how magneto-optical drives could be cheaper and faster than HDDs

Physicists at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have used perovskite materials to alter a magnetic bit’s polarity with light, potentially opening the door to denser and faster disk drives using magneto-optical technology.



EPFL introduces perovskite-based light-operated hard drives image

Researchers László Forró, Bálint Náfrádi, Péter Szirmai and Endre Horváth suggest magneto-optical drives using this method could be physically smaller, faster and cheaper than today’s disk drives. They also say it is an alternative to heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR).

EPFL team reports on new method to enable rapid and stable production of perovskite solar cells

Researchers at EPFL in Switzerland have reported on the use of Flash Infrared Annealing (FIRA) to rapidly produce efficient, stable perovskite solar cells.

FIRA shares many characteristics with thermal annealing techniques already used to grow pure crystal phases for the semiconductor industry. It works by using a short IR pulse to rapidly nucleate a perovskite film from a precursor solution, without the need for a high-temperature scaffold. The high speed and relatively low processing temperatures mean that FIRA is compatible with large-area deposition techniques, like roll-to-roll processing. For PSCs, it could offer a practical route to scaling-up production.

International research team reaches 21.6% efficiency perovskite cell using concentrator PV

An international research team that included scientists from the University of Exeter, in the U.K., Switzerland’s Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Saudi Arabia’s Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research has reported hitting 21.6% perovskite solar cell efficiency by using concentrator photovoltaic technology.

PSC with concentrator imagePSC with a concentrator

A triple-cation based, n-i-p structured perovskite cell has reportedly been developed at low levels of solar concentration. According to the researchers, standard single-junction perovskite cells usually reach efficiencies of 21% but only in devices smaller than 1mm². “The use of concentrator photovoltaics with a 0.81mm²-sized perovskite solar cell (PSC) further increased the efficiency levels up to 23.1% opening up a new line of research combining PSCs with low concentrating photovoltaic technologies,” the authors of the study wrote.

New approach to stabilize perovskite material may yield improved solar cells

An international research team, including scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has found a stable that efficiently creates electricity and could be extremely beneficial for perovskite solar cells.

The researchers show how the material CsPbI3, an inorganic perovskite, has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

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