EPFL logo imageEPFL is a Switzerland-based technical university and research center. EPFL is focuses on three missions: teaching, research and technology transfer. EPFL works together with an extensive network of partners including other universities and institutes of technology, secondary schools and colleges, industry and economy, political circles and the general public.

EPFL does extensive perovskite R&D work and is responsible for many publications and advancements in the field.

Company Address: 
Route Cantonale
1015 Lausanne
Switzerland

The latest EPFL perovskite news:

EPFL team reports on new method to enable rapid and stable production of perovskite solar cells

Researchers at EPFL in Switzerland have reported on the use of Flash Infrared Annealing (FIRA) to rapidly produce efficient, stable perovskite solar cells.

FIRA shares many characteristics with thermal annealing techniques already used to grow pure crystal phases for the semiconductor industry. It works by using a short IR pulse to rapidly nucleate a perovskite film from a precursor solution, without the need for a high-temperature scaffold. The high speed and relatively low processing temperatures mean that FIRA is compatible with large-area deposition techniques, like roll-to-roll processing. For PSCs, it could offer a practical route to scaling-up production.

International research team reaches 21.6% efficiency perovskite cell using concentrator PV

An international research team that included scientists from the University of Exeter, in the U.K., Switzerland’s Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) and Saudi Arabia’s Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials Research has reported hitting 21.6% perovskite solar cell efficiency by using concentrator photovoltaic technology.



PSC with concentrator imagePSC with a concentrator

A triple-cation based, n-i-p structured perovskite cell has reportedly been developed at low levels of solar concentration. According to the researchers, standard single-junction perovskite cells usually reach efficiencies of 21% but only in devices smaller than 1mm². “The use of concentrator photovoltaics with a 0.81mm²-sized perovskite solar cell (PSC) further increased the efficiency levels up to 23.1% opening up a new line of research combining PSCs with low concentrating photovoltaic technologies,” the authors of the study wrote.

New approach to stabilize perovskite material may yield improved solar cells

An international research team, including scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has found a stable that efficiently creates electricity and could be extremely beneficial for perovskite solar cells.

The researchers show how the material CsPbI3, an inorganic perovskite, has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

Perovskite solar cells' behavior under real-world conditions is tested - in the lab

Researchers at the lab of Anders Hagfeldt at EPFL, working with colleagues at the lab of Michael Grätzel, brought real-world conditions into the controlled environment of the lab. Using data from a weather station near Lausanne (Switzerland), they reproduced the real-world temperature and irradiance profiles from specific days during the course of the year, to test PSCs in real-world conditions.

PSCs tested for real world conditions in the lab image

With this approach, the scientists were able to quantify the energy yield of the devices under realistic conditions. “This is what ultimately counts for the real-world application of solar cells," says Dr. Wolfgang Tress from EPFL.

Collaborative team focuses on MA to better understand perovskite PV stability issues

Researchers from the University of Fribourg and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland, Pandit Deendayal Petroleum University in India and Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla in Mexico have revealed new clues about the stability of perovskite thin films and solar cells.

“Our chief aim is to stabilize perovskite solar cells for many years and decades,” explains Michael Saliba, principal investigator at the Adolphe Merkle Institute, University of Fribourg. “Without long-term stability, any commercialization efforts will fail.”

Tags: