EPFL logo imageEPFL is a Switzerland-based technical university and research center. EPFL is focuses on three missions: teaching, research and technology transfer. EPFL works together with an extensive network of partners including other universities and institutes of technology, secondary schools and colleges, industry and economy, political circles and the general public.

EPFL does extensive perovskite R&D work and is responsible for many publications and advancements in the field.

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The latest EPFL perovskite news:

Researchers design novel X-ray photodetectors based on perovskites on top of graphene

A team of scientists, led by László Forró from the School of Basic Sciences at the Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland, has developed a new X-Ray Photodetector based on perovskites and graphene.

Using 3D aerosol jet-printing technology, the team designed a new technique for creating highly efficient x-ray photodetectors that can be easily added to standard microelectronic circuits, creating more powerful medical imaging devices that can deliver better scan qualities.

EPFL team develops perovskite material that can detect gamma rays

Researchers at Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), assisted by teams at Croatia's University of Split, have developed a perovskite that can detect gamma rays.



The “oriented crystal‐crystal growth” (OC2G) method of large MAPbBr3 crystals imageThe “oriented crystal‐crystal growth” (OC2G) method of large MAPbBr3 crystals . a) Growing of large crystals by the suspended seed crystal; b,c) The consecutive steps of fusing together individual single crystals into a large crystal. Image by EPFL

"This photovoltaic perovskite crystal, grown in this kilogram size, is a game changer," says EPFL's Professors Lászlo Forró. "You can slice it into wafers, like silicon, for optoelectronic applications, and, in this paper, we demonstrate its utility in gamma-ray detection."

EPFL team develops deposition method to overcome formamidinium issues

Metal halide perovskites are often made by mixing cations or halides with formamidinium (FAPbI3), to get high power-conversion efficiency in perovskite solar cells. But at the same time, the most stable phase of FAPbI3 is photoinactive, meaning that it does not react to light—the opposite of what a solar power harvester should do. In addition, solar cells made with FAPbI3 show long-term stability issues. Now, researchers led by Michael Grätzel and Anders Hafgeldt at EPFL, have developed a deposition method that overcomes the formamidinium issues while maintaining the high conversion of perovskite solar cells.

In the new method, the materials are first treated with a vapor of methylammonium thiocyanate (MASCN) or formamidinium thiocyanate FASCN. This innovative tweak turns the photoinactive FAPbI3 perovskite films to the desired photosensitive ones.

EPFL team uses perovskites to show how magneto-optical drives could be cheaper and faster than HDDs

Physicists at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland have used perovskite materials to alter a magnetic bit’s polarity with light, potentially opening the door to denser and faster disk drives using magneto-optical technology.

EPFL introduces perovskite-based light-operated hard drives image

Researchers László Forró, Bálint Náfrádi, Péter Szirmai and Endre Horváth suggest magneto-optical drives using this method could be physically smaller, faster and cheaper than today’s disk drives. They also say it is an alternative to heat-assisted magnetic recording (HAMR).

EPFL team reaches 23.5% efficiency of its perovskite solar cells using a stable composition of perovskite materials

Research by EPFL shows that a new engineered passivator, 4‐tert‐butyl‐benzylammonium iodide (tBBAI), has bulky tert‐butyl groups that prevent unwanted aggregation by steric repulsion. It was found that simple surface treatment with tBBAI significantly accelerates the charge extraction from the perovskite into the spiro‐OMeTAD hole‐transporter, while retarding the nonradiative charge carrier recombination.

This boosts the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the PSC from ≈20% to 23.5%, reducing the hysteresis to barely detectable levels.

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