UK researchers suggest a new way to improve the performance of perovskite solar cells

The performance pf perovskite-based solar cells is affected by several factors, one of which can be ion defects that can move around. As these defects move, they affect the internal electric environment within the cell. The Perovskite material is responsible for absorbing light to create electronic charge, and also for helping to extract the charge into an external circuit before it is lost to a process called 'recombination'. Most of the detrimental recombination can occur in different locations within the solar cell. In some designs it occurs mainly within the perovskite, while in others it happens at the edges of the perovskite where it contacts the adjacent materials known as transport layers.

Now, researchers from the Universities of Portsmouth, Southampton and Bath have developed a way to adjust the properties of the transport layers to encourage the ionic defects within the perovskite to move in such a way that they suppress recombination and lead to more efficient charge extraction - increasing the proportion of the light energy falling on the surface of the cell that can ultimately be used.

Chinese researchers create efficient perovskite-based solar cells using Graphdiyne, a unique carbon material

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences have reported that the introduction of a certain amount of graphdiyne (25%), a form of carbon material invented by Chinese scientists with independent intellectual property rights, as a host material in perovskite solar cells can successfully push the device efficiency up to 21.01%, achieving multiple positive effects of highly crystalline qualities, large domain sizes and few grain boundaries.

Chinese researchers create efficient perovskite-based solar cells using Graphdiyne, a unique carbon material image

The researchers also revealed that the current-voltage hysteresis was negligible, and device stability was improved as well. It was found that graphdiyne as the host active material significantly affects the crystallization, film morphology and a series of optoelectronic properties of perovskite active layer.

Perovskite-based quantum dots - a guest post by Ossila

What are Quantum Dots?

Quantum dots (QDs) are semiconducting nanocrystals that are very small – only a few nanometres in size. In display technologies, the most common types of QDs used are composed of a metal chalcogenide core. These QDs have the chemical formula XY – where X is a metal and Y is sulfur, tellurium or selenium (e.g. CdTe, CdSe, ZnS) – which is encased with the shell of a second semiconductor (e.g. CdSe/CdS). Their tiny dimensions mean that charge carriers are confined in close proximity, which gives QDs optical and electronic properties that are substantially different from those of large semiconductor crystals.

QLEDs vs OLEDs

In particular, QDs have enhanced light absorption and emission, making them particularly suitable for display technologies. Metal chalcogenide quantum dots (MCQDs) have already made it into commercial products – most notably, in Samsung’s QLED television range. Here, a blue LED backlight excites a layer of quantum dots on an LCD panel, causing them to emit light. The color of light emitted by the quantum dots depends on their size – with small dots emitting blue light, and progressively larger dots emitting green, yellow, orange, and red light.

Ossila QD structure imageLeft: Core-shell quantum dot structure. Right: The size of the dot defines the color of light that the dot emits. (Source: Ossila.com)

Perovskite solar cell developer Swift Solar raises $4.6 million

Swift Solar logo imageSwift Solar, A U.S startup designing and manufacturing perovskite solar panels, has announced raising $4.6 million as part of a $6.6 million investment round.

The team at Swift Solar in Colorado includes leading solar technologists from Stanford, MIT, Cambridge (UK), Oxford (UK), and the University of Washington, with expertise in perovskite photovoltaic technology and scale-up. Swift’s core technologies range from new solar cell architectures to specialized manufacturing techniques initially developed in the labs at Stanford and MIT.

The best of 2018 - top perovskite stories

2018 is soon over - and it was another exciting year for the perovskite industry. We've seen many new research advances, but more importantly , we are starting to see first signs of commercialization. 2018 was also an exciting year for Perovskite-Info, as we have experienced significant growth and published our Perovskite Handbook - which demonstrates positive sales and feedback.

Here are the top 10 stories posted on Perovskite-Info in 2018, ranked by popularity (i.e. how many people read the story):

  1. Microquanta reaches 17.9% efficiency for perovskite solar mini-module (Jul 3)
  2. Saule Technologies' perovskite-based solar panels headed for commercial implementation by building company Skanska (Jan 17)
  3. Greatcell Solar announces bankruptcy (Dec 11)
  4. Berkeley team creates perovskite material for smart photovoltaic windows (Jan 23)
  5. Novel microscopic analysis of perovskite solar cells deepens understanding of their degradation (Jan 17)
  6. Solliance and ECN make great strides in improving tandem solar cells (Mar 21)
  7. Oxford PV sets new record with perovskite tandem solar cells with 27.3% conversion efficiency (Jun 26)
  8. Duke team develops a method to create hybrid thin-film materials (Jan 4)
  9. Researchers demonstrate controlled epitaxial growth of all inorganic lead-free halide perovskites (Apr 2)
  10. New titanium-based material shows promise for lead-free perovskite-based PV (Feb 14)

Saule Technologies' perovskite solar panel installed in innovative Japanese hotel

The Henn-na Hotel in Japan, a technologically advanced hotel staffed by robots, now officially features perovskite solar technology developed by Saule Technologies. The installed commercial prototype is made of 72 perovskite modules encapsulated in curved glass.

Saule Technologies' perovskite solar panel installed in innovative Japanese hotel image

The aim of the hotel's owner is to make it electrically sustainable. Believing the perovskite solar cells may be a solution and therefore introducing it as a part of the Henn-na Hotel latest tech-solutions, it became the first hospitality facility in the world to have perovskite technology adopted.

Oxford PV hits 28% efficiency with its tandem silicon-perovskite solar cells

Oxford PV, a leading developer of perovskite solar cells, has announced a new, certified, 28% efficiency world record for its perovskite-based solar cell.

Oxford PV hits new efficiency record image

Oxford PV’s 1 cm2 perovskite-silicon tandem solar cell has achieved a 28% conversion efficiency, certified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The achievement trumps Oxford PV’s previous certified record of 27.3% efficiency for its perovskite-silicon solar cell, announced earlier this year.