New method quantifies the efficiency of crystal semiconductors

Researchers at Tohoku University in Japan have found a new way to successfully detect the efficiency of crystal semiconductors. For the first time, the team used a specific kind of photoluminescence spectroscopy, a way to detect light, to characterize the semiconductors. The emitted light energy was used as an indicator of the crystal's quality. This method will potentially yield more efficient light-emitting diodes (LEDs), solar cells and several other advances in electronics.

Internal quantum efficiency of semiconducting crystals quantified by new method imageSchematic of the ARPL measurement technique

"For further development of perovskite-based devices, it is essential to quantitatively evaluate the absolute efficiency in high-quality perovskite crystals without assuming any predefined physical model is of particular importance," said corresponding author Kazunobu Kojima, Associate Professor at Tohoku University, Japan. "Our method is new and unique because previous methods have relied on efficiency estimation by model-dependent analyses of photoluminescence."

Mixing perovskite nanoparticles with 2D perovskites may give a boost to the efficiency of blue LEDs

Researchers from Zhejiang University, the Beijing Institute of Technology and Nanjing Tech University in China, Argonne National Laboratory in the U.S, University of Cambridge in the UK have combined perovskite nanoparticles with 2D perovskites to double the efficiency of blue LEDs.

Perovskite particle mix to push forward blue LEDs imageBromide perovskite films consisting of nanoparticles embedded within 2-D perovskite layers produce blue LEDs with a record-high efficiency of 9.5%

While the device only glows for a few minutes, the work is still considered “a big step toward the development of high-performance blue perovskite emitters” says Jianjun Tian of the University of Science and Technology in Beijing, who was not involved in the work. “The efficiency of these blue perovskite LEDs is already higher than that of the commercially available blue organic LEDs.”

New approach to stabilize perovskite material may yield improved solar cells

An international research team, including scientists from Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), and the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST), has found a stable that efficiently creates electricity and could be extremely beneficial for perovskite solar cells.

The researchers show how the material CsPbI3, an inorganic perovskite, has been stabilized in a new configuration capable of reaching high conversion efficiencies. This configuration is noteworthy as stabilizing these materials has historically been a challenge.

Indian government invites perovskite solar research proposals

India’s Ministry of New and Renewable Energy (MNRE) has invited project proposals from industrial players, startups and R&D labs for high-efficiency perovskite solar cells, solar panel recycling, hybrid inverters and new applications that combine solar and storage, among others.

Specific R&D areas include the processes for segregating different components of end-of-life PV modules, as well as the recycling of glass. Research will also focus on grid-tied inverters that are suitable for the Indian grid and the country’s environmental conditions, in addition to hybrid inverters with capacities of up to 500 KVA, electronics for HT grid stabilization that incorporate storage batteries, and high-efficiency perovskite solar cells on single- and multicrystalline silicon substrates.

Tokyo Tech team discovers a way to improve perovskite-based light-emitting diodes

Researchers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have designed a new strategy to make efficient perovskite-based LEDs with improved brightness by leveraging the quantum confinement effect.

Photoluminescence and electroluminsecence in low-dimensional and 3D perovskite-based devices image(A) Photoluminescence and (B) electroluminsecence in low-dimensional and 3D perovskite-based devices

Devices that emit light when an electric current is applied, are referred to as electroluminescent devices, which have become orders of magnitude more efficient than the traditional incandescent light bulb. Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) make for the most notable and prevalent category of these devices. Many additional types of LEDs also exist.