Perovskite-Info: the perovskite experts

Perovskite-Info is a news hub and knowledge center born out of keen interest in the wide range of perovskite materials.

Perovskites are a class of materials that share a similar structure, which display a myriad of exciting properties like superconductivity, magnetoresistance and more. These easily synthesized materials are considered the future of solar cells, as their distinctive structure makes them perfect for enabling low-cost, efficient photovoltaics. They are also predicted to play a role in next-gen electric vehicle batteries, sensors, lasers and much more.

Recent perovskite News

Solliance and ECN make great strides in improving tandem solar cells

The recent Silicon PV/nPV conference in Lausanne, Switzerland, saw Solliance's announcement on the achievement of a major milestone in perovskite technology for application in future industrial high efficiency tandem photovoltaic cells and modules. Solliance announced realizing a perovskite cell that combines good cell efficiency with a very high near infrared transparency of 93%.

Also at the conference, ECN shows that when this perovskite cell is mechanically stacked on a 6 inch2 silicon bottom cell with its proprietary MWT-SHJ (metal-wrap-through silicon heterojunction) design, 26.3% efficiency is achieved, an increase of 3.6% points over the efficiency of the directly illuminated silicon cell laminate.

US scientists gain new insight into the working mechanisms of hybrid perovskite solar cells

Researchers at Stanford University and the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have gained new understanding of the happenings inside a hybrid perovskite material in the first few trillionths of a second after it’s hit with simulated sunlight.

US scientists get new insight into inner workings of hybrid perovskites imageThe blue and green spheres are atoms. When light hits, electrons start to separate from positively charged “holes,” the first step in creating an electrical current (yellow streaks). Meanwhile, atoms begin to vibrate within the perovskite’s structure.

The research, conducted at the atomic scale, could help explain how electric charges move efficiently through hybrid perovskites following the absorption of light, the crucial first step in generating an electric current. The study used laser pulses that match the intensity of solar radiation, and thus mimic natural sunlight. The authors say their discovery could lead to improvements in the performance of perovskite solar cells and a new way to probe their functionality.

Panasonic and Sekisui Chemical develop large-area perovskite solar cells

Panasonic and Sekisui Chemical have reportedly developed perovskite-based solar cells that can be attached to walls and curved surfaces.

Panasonic developed a 20cm by 20cm perovskite solar cell. Panels made of these cells can be joined together to create sheets large enough for commercial uses. The company hopes to increase the cells' power generation efficiency to 20%; they are now slightly more than halfway there.

Cornell team uses laser pulses to change the properties of a perovskite material

Researchers at Cornell used theoretical techniques to predict that using intense mid-infrared laser light on a titanium perovskite can dynamically induce a magnetic phase transition – taking the material from its ferromagnetic ground state to a hidden anti-ferromagnetic phase. This dramatic shift could have useful applications, particularly in optical information processing.

“It would be a kind of optical switch,” the researchers said. “You have a material where it’s magnetic and ‘non-magnetic.’ It’s going between those two states with light”.

Perovskite-Info interviews Ossila's lead perovskite scientist

UK-based Ossila provides components, equipment and materials to enable faster and smarter organic electronics research and discovery. Ossila provides both materials and equipment for perovskite researchers, and the company's lead perovskite scientist, Dr. Jonathan Griffin, was kind enough to answer a few questions we had for him.

Perovskite crystals (Ossila)Thanks to improved knowledge about salt-solvent interactions, single crystals of perovskites can now be grown. Pictured above are several single-crystal MAPbBr perovskites, alongside the seed crystals used to grow these crystals

Dr. Griffin holds nearly a decade of experience working in organic photovoltaic research and over 5 years of working with perovskites. At Ossila, Jonathan works on technical support for several material ranges, including perovskites, organic photovoltaics, graphene and other 2-D materials. He is also involved in the development of new test equipment and product ranges. Prior to this, he worked in a postdoctoral research position at the University of Sheffield.

Q: Thank you for your time Dr. Griffin. Can you detail for us Ossila's perovskite product range in general?

Unique perovskite found trapped in a diamond at Earth's surface

University of Alberta scientists have found calcium silicate perovskite at Earth's surface. "Nobody has ever managed to keep this mineral stable at the Earth's surface," said Graham Pearson, a professor in the University of Alberta's Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences and Canada Excellence Research Chair Laureate. He explained the mineral is found deep inside Earth's mantle, at 700 kilometers.

"The only possible way of preserving this mineral at the Earth's surface is when it's trapped in an unyielding container like a diamond," he explained. "Based on our findings, there could be as much as zetta tonnes (1021) of this perovskite in deep Earth".

Oxford PV moves headquarters and perovskite solar R&D to new site

Oxford PV has announced it has moved its UK-based headquarters and R&D facilities to a new location in Oxford, UK. The new site consolidates and strengthens Oxford PV’s UK-based perovskite photovoltaic research and development activities, by providing a larger, controlled laboratory environment, with ample space for expansion of its equipment and expertise in the future.

Oxford PV’s experienced research and development team at the site will continue to focus on advancing its perovskite photovoltaic technology. Additionally, Oxford PV’s UK team will continue to support the transfer of its advanced lab based perovskite on silicon tandem solar cell technology to industrial scale processes and equipment, an activity that takes place at the company’s pilot line, in Brandenburg an der Havel, Germany, in close collaboration with its joint development partner – a major manufacturer of silicon solar cells and modules.