The Perovskite Handbook

Perovskite-Info is proud to present The Perovskite Handbook. This book is a comprehensive guide to perovskite materials, applications and industry. Perovskites are materials that share a similar structure, which display a myriad of exciting properties and are considered the future of solar cells, displays, sensors, lasers and more.

The Perovskite Handbook

Reading this book, you'll learn all about:

  • Different perovskite materials, their properties and structure
  • How perovskites can be made, tuned and used
  • What kinds of applications perovskites may be suitable for
  • What the obstacles on the way to a perovskite revolution are
  • Perovskite solar cells, their merits and challenges
  • The state of the perovskite market, potential and future

Lead-free halide double perovskites successfully made to emit warm white light

Researchers at Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST) in China, University of Toledo in the U.S, Monash University in Australia, Jilin University and Tsinghua University in China, the Dalian Institute in China and the University of Toronto in Canada have examined a lead-free double perovskite that exhibited stable and efficient white light emission. In its mechanism of action, the material produced self-trapped excitons (STEs) due to Jahn-Teller distortion of the AgCl6 octahedron in the excited state of the complex, observed when investigating exciton-phonon coupling in the crystal lattice.

Lead-free halide double perovskites successfully made to emit warm white light image

The research team stated that a fifth of global electricity consumption is based on lighting, and efficient and stable white-light emission with single materials is ideal for such applications. Photon emission that covers the entire visible spectrum is, however, difficult to attain with a single material. Metal halide perovskites, for instance, have outstanding emission properties but contain lead, and so yield unsatisfactory stability. The perovskite in this study is, therefore, lead-free.

Cambridge team sets new efficiency record for perovskite LEDs

Researchers at the University of Cambridge have announced a new efficiency record for LEDs based on perovskite semiconductors, reportedly rivaling that of the best organic LEDs (OLEDs).

The team stated that compared to OLEDs, which are widely used in high-end consumer electronics, the perovskite-based LEDs can be made at much lower costs, and can be tuned to emit light across the visible and near-infrared spectra with high color purity.

Perovskite-based LEDs reach an efficiency milestone

Two papers have recently been published, reporting on perovskite-based LEDs. The efficiencies with which some perovskite LEDs (PLEDs) produce light from electrons already seem to rival those of OLEDs.

Perovskite-based LEDs structure image

Both papers, by Cao et al. and Lin et al., have developed PLEDs that break an important technological barrier: the external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the devices, which quantifies the number of photons produced per electron consumed, is greater than 20%. There are several similarities between the devices reported by the two groups. Perhaps most notably, the active (emissive) perovskite layer is about 200 nanometres thick in both cases, and is sandwiched between two relatively simple electrodes. This design is called a planar structure, and is the most basic manifestation of diodes made from thin films of materials. The electrodes are appropriately modified to ensure that electrons and holes (quasiparticles formed by the absence of electrons in atomic lattices) are efficiently pumped into the perovskite. As in all LEDs, when electrons meet holes, they can release energy in the form of photons through a process known as radiative recombination.

Simple technique yields full-color perovskite LEDs

A next-generation optical material based on perovskite nanoparticles can achieve vivid colors even on very large screens. Due to their high color purity and low cost advantages, it has also gained much interests in industry. A recent study including researchers with UNIST has introduced a simple technique to extract the three primary colors (red, blue, green) from this material.

Simple fabrication of full-color perovskite LEDs image

This innovative work was led by Professor Jin Young Kim in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST. In the study, the research team introduced a simple technique that freely controls light emitting spectra by adjusting the anion halides in perovskite materials. The key is to adjust the anion halides by dissolving them in solvents to achieve red, blue and green lights. Application of this technique to LEDs can result in crystal-clear picture quality.