Researchers use perovskite QDs to design a device that mimics brain cells used for human vision

University of Central Florida researchers are helping to close the gap separating human and machine minds, using a technology based on perovskite quantum dots. In a recent study, a UCF research team showed that by combining two promising nanomaterials into a new superstructure, they could create a nanoscale device that mimics the neural pathways of brain cells used for human vision.

"This is a baby step toward developing neuromorphic computers, which are computer processors that can simultaneously process and memorize information," said Jayan Thomas, an associate professor in UCF's NanoScience Technology Center and Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "This can reduce the processing time as well as the energy required for processing. At some time in the future, this invention may help to make robots that can think like humans."

CSoT demonstrates a 6.6" 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots for color conversion

China-based display maker China Star (CSoT, a subsidiary of TCL) demonstrated a 6.6-inch 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots as a color conversion film.

CSoT is using blue OLED emitter materials, and a perovskite layer to up-convert the color to green (this is a monochrome prototype - evidently a very early prototype). CSoT brands its perovskite-OLEDs as PE-OLED and we believe this is the first time a perovskite-enhanced display has been publicly demonstrated.

New technology produces perovskite quantum dots with excellent color purity and stability

A Taiwan-based research team has developed spray synthesis technology for producing perovskite quantum dots (PQDs). The technology reportedly features a photoluminescence quantum yield rate of nearly 100% and high color purity and stability of PQDs, according to Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), which sponsors the R&D project.

Using spray synthesis technology, nanometer-sized perovskite crystals are separated from perovskite precursors in solvent and then the crystals are centrifuged to extract PQDs of same sizes, said Lin Hao-wu, which leads the team from the Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University (NTHU).

Researchers improved the stability of PSCs using hybrids of graphene and molybdenum disulphide quantum dots

Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have managed to increase the stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) using hybrids of graphene and molybdenum disulphide quantum dots.

Graphene inks help stabilize the stability of perovskite solar cells

The team used molybdenum disulphide quantum dot/graphene hybrids to address PSCs' instability issue. The collaboration between research institutions and industrial partners enabled by Graphene Flagship, yielded an ink based on graphene and related materials (GRMs). Layering this over the PSCs caused them to drastically increase in stability.