CSoT demonstrates a 6.6" 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots for color conversion

China-based display maker China Star (CSoT, a subsidiary of TCL) demonstrated a 6.6-inch 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots as a color conversion film.

CSoT is using blue OLED emitter materials, and a perovskite layer to up-convert the color to green (this is a monochrome prototype - evidently a very early prototype). CSoT brands its perovskite-OLEDs as PE-OLED and we believe this is the first time a perovskite-enhanced display has been publicly demonstrated.

New technology produces perovskite quantum dots with excellent color purity and stability

A Taiwan-based research team has developed spray synthesis technology for producing perovskite quantum dots (PQDs). The technology reportedly features a photoluminescence quantum yield rate of nearly 100% and high color purity and stability of PQDs, according to Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST), which sponsors the R&D project.

Using spray synthesis technology, nanometer-sized perovskite crystals are separated from perovskite precursors in solvent and then the crystals are centrifuged to extract PQDs of same sizes, said Lin Hao-wu, which leads the team from the Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University (NTHU).

Researchers improved the stability of PSCs using hybrids of graphene and molybdenum disulphide quantum dots

Researchers from the Graphene Flagship have managed to increase the stability of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) using hybrids of graphene and molybdenum disulphide quantum dots.

Graphene inks help stabilize the stability of perovskite solar cells

The team used molybdenum disulphide quantum dot/graphene hybrids to address PSCs' instability issue. The collaboration between research institutions and industrial partners enabled by Graphene Flagship, yielded an ink based on graphene and related materials (GRMs). Layering this over the PSCs caused them to drastically increase in stability.

New microfluidic system could revolutionize perovskite quantum dot manufacturing

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a microfluidic system for synthesizing perovskite quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light. The system is said to drastically reduce manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

New microfluidic system could revolutionize perovskite quantum dot manufacturing image

Quantum dots (QDs) are promising materials for applications ranging from biological sensing and imaging to LED displays and solar energy harvesting. The new system can be used to continuously manufacture high-quality QDs for use in these applications. "We call this system the Nanocrystal (NC) Factory, and it builds on the NanoRobo microfluidic platform that we unveiled in 2017," says Milad Abolhasani, an assistant professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at NC State and corresponding author of the study.

Perovskite QDs hold promise for quantum computing and communications

Researchers at MIT, ETH Zurich and Empa have made major steps toward finding a photon source with constant, predictable, and steady characteristics. In the quest to develop practical computing and communications devices based on the principles of quantum physics, such a source of individual particles of light is extremely desirable. The study involves using perovskites to make light-emitting quantum dots.

Perovskite QDs hold promise for quantum computing and communications imageScanning Transmission Electron Microscope image (STEM) of single perovskite quantum dots

The ability to produce individual photons with precisely known and persistent properties, including a wavelength, or color, that does not fluctuate at all, could be useful for many kinds of proposed quantum devices. Since each photon would be indistinguishable from the others in terms of its quantum-mechanical properties, it could be possible, for example, to delay one of them and then get the pair to interact with each other, in a phenomenon called interference.