A change in chemical composition could boost stability of perovskite solar cells

Researchers from Colorado University in Boulder with the US Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have shown how a change in chemical composition managed to boost the longevity and efficiency of a perovskite solar cell.

The new formula reportedly enabled the solar cell to resist a stability problem that has so far thwarted the commercialization of perovskites. The problem is known as light-induced phase-segregation, which occurs when the alloys that make up the solar cells break down under exposure to continuous light.

Italian research team develops graphene-enhanced tandem perovskite cell with 26.3% efficiency

Italian researchers from two Italian institutions claim to have developed a two-terminal tandem perovskite-silicon solar cell with a conversion efficiency 26.3%.

Structure of graphene-enhanced PSC image

The researchers added graphene to the titanium dioxide electron selective layer used in a perovskite solar cell to increase chemical stability. The two-terminal cell was made by stacking two sub-cells which were fabricated and optimized separately. The new device blends the advantages of thin-film perovskite and silicon-based heterojunction cells, according to its developers.

Peppermint oil and walnut aroma to enable HT material that prevents lead leakage in perovskite solar cells

Researchers at the Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH) have developed eco-friendly-solvent processable hole transport polymers by using peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives and the polymer can prevent lead leakage.

The POSTECH research team consisted of Prof. Taiho Park and Junwoo Lee, that developed Alkoxy-PTEG - hole transport polymers that could be dissolved in peppermint oil, by applying ethylene glycol side chains when producing perovskite solar cells. Also, the team confirmed that this polymer captured leaking lead in aging perovskite solar cells.

New electron transport layer material could boost the stability of perovskite LEDs

A team of scientists from the NUST MISIS Laboratory of Advanced Solar Energy has proposed a new approach that uses the two-dimensional inorganic material zirconium trisulfide as the electron transport layer of a perovskite LED. In the future, this may allow the mass production of a new type of light-emitting diodes, as well as solving the problem of LED displays degradation, for example, in smartphones and TVs.

New ETL material could push forawrd perovskite LEDs image

The screens of many modern smartphones and TVs "suffer" from pixel burnout. Due to the presence of an organic component in OLED-type matrices (and their derivatives), pixels begin to degrade when the same icons on the screen are lit for a long time. So far, manufacturers advise users to periodically change the screen interface, rearrange the icons in places and regularly update the screen saver. In fact, the problem could be solved by minimizing the use of organic components in the screen matrix. Perovskite diodes are proposed as a way to make a revolution in designing screens.

Researchers develop new treatment to enhance the stability of perovskite solar cells

Researchers at China’s Xi’an Jiaotong University have developed a solar cell based on multiple-cation lead mixed-halide perovskite (MLMP), which reportedly has a stronger moisture resistance compared to cells based on single-halide perovskites.

The team says that mixed halides offer the chance to manufacture more reproducible, thermally stable films with higher crystal qualities. However, these halides also suffer from stability issues due to abundant point defects and dangling bonds at the grain boundary and film surface. In order to address this problem, the scientists turned to interface engineering. They used phosphorus-containing Lewis acid and base molecules such as triphenylphosphine oxide (TPPO), tetraisopropyl methylenediphosphonate (TMPP), and tris (pentafluorophenyl) phosphine (TPFP) in the surface passivation process.