FSU team uses old materials to tackle stability issues of next-gen perovskite solar cells

A Florida State University research team has addressed perovskite solar cells' stability issue by mixing the old with the new. Professor of Chemistry Biwu Ma and his team published a new study that shows if you add a layer of ancient organic pigment to a perovskite solar cell, it increases the stability and efficiency of the cell.

“Pigments are abundant, low cost and robust,” Ma said. “When we combine them with perovskites, we can generate new high-performance hybrid systems. It’s using the old with the new, and together they produce something really exciting.”

HZB team paves the way for improved ink design to enable industrial-scale manufacturing of perovskite thin films

An HZB team at BESSY II recently analyzed the crystallization processes within optimized inks used for the production of metal-halide perovskite thin-films for photovoltaic modules . A model has also been developed to assess the kinetics of the crystallization processes for different solvent mixtures. The results could be of high importance for the further development of perovskite inks for industrial-scale deposition processes of these semiconductors.

Schematic representation of the experiment in the article image

For the production of larger area photovoltaic modules, the team of Dr. Eva Unger develops printing and coating processes in which the perovskite semiconductor is processed from inks containing the precursors dissolved in solvents. The composition of the ink determines the material formation mechanism with the solvent affecting the process by its rheological properties, evaporation rate and participation in intermediate phases. "Our research question in this project was: How can we rationalize the difference in crystallization kinetics when using different solvents," explains Unger, who heads the Young Investigator Group Hybrid Materials Formation and Scaling.

Magnetic lead-free double perovskite could be useful for spintronics devices

An international researchers team recently found that a new “double perovskite” material could become a more environmentally friendly platform for spintronics devices thanks to its lead-free nature. While the material in its current form is only magnetic below 30 K – too low for practical applications – developers at Linköping University in Sweden, together with colleagues in the US, the Czech Republic, Japan, Australia and China, say that their preliminary experiments are a promising step towards making rapid and energy-efficient information storage devices from this novel optoelectronic material.

Recently, researchers discovered that lead halide perovskites display interesting spin properties thanks to lead’s strong spin-orbit coupling. This coupling links the motion of an electron to its quantum spin, and its strength determines how much the intrinsic spin of an electron will interact with the magnetic field induced as the electron moves through the material. Such a coupling is therefore important not only for the magnetic properties of a material, but also for the performance of any spintronics devices.

POTECH team designed highly efficient and stable PSC materials using an organic spacer molecular additive

Researchers at POSTECH recently developed an organic spacer molecular additive that can improve both the photoelectric efficiency and stability of perovskites.

The POSTECH team, led by Professor Kilwon Cho and Ph.D. candidate Sungwon Song of the Department of Chemical Engineering, succeeded in fabricating perovskite solar cells that are highly efficient and stable by drastically reducing the concentration of internal defects in the crystals as well as increasing the moisture resistance of perovskite by introducing a new organic spacer molecule additive in the perovskite crystal.

Stanford team designs ultrafast way to manufacture perovskite solar modules

A research team at Stanford University has designed a new perovskite manufacturing process. In their work, the team demonstrated an ultrafast way to produce stable perovskite cells and assemble them into solar modules that could power devices, buildings and even the electricity grid.

“This work provides a new milestone for perovskite manufacturing,” said study senior author Reinhold Dauskardt, the Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the Stanford School of Engineering. “It resolves some of the most formidable barriers to module-scale manufacturing that the community has been dealing with for years.”