Researchers develop novel method to fabricate perovskite-based light-emitting diodes using quantum confinement

Researchers from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Heilongjiang University, City University of Hong Kong and Sun Yat-sen University have developed a novel technique to fabricate perovskite-based light-emitting diodes using quantum confinement.

According to theory, by adjusting the compositions of the halide being used, i.e., iodine, bromine, and chlorine, the color of the emission may be fine-tuned. Nevertheless, color instability caused by migration of ions and separation in blended halides impedes the future development of perovskite-based LEDs, particularly blue perovskite-based LEDs, which require significantly higher voltages for proper operation. A potential strategy for achieving color controllability in perovskite-based LEDs is to use perovskite-based nanostructures which utilize quantum confinement.

Perovskites can help develop flexible transparent displays

Researchers from Korea's Sungkyunkwan University and Gyeongsang National University have developed an innovative technique to develop transparent displays with high resolution and flexibility using perovskite materials.

Solution-based perovskites have been attracting attention in the area of display technology for many years, due to their exceptional optical-based electronic characteristics and ease of preparation. Owing to the benefits of solution-based perovskites, researchers have long envisioned the commercial adoption and implementation of flexible transparent displays.

NREL team highlights the potential of perovskites for renewable hydrogen production

A recent analysis carried out by scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have found that perovskite materials could play an important role in a process to produce hydrogen in a renewable manner.

NREL Scientists Advance Renewable Hydrogen Production Method image

The NREL scientists analyzed an emerging water-splitting technology called solar thermochemical hydrogen (STCH) production, which can be potentially more energy efficient than producing hydrogen via the commonly used electrolysis method. Electrolysis needs electricity to split water into hydrogen and oxygen. STCH relies on a two-step chemical process in which metal oxides are exposed to temperatures greater than 1,400 degrees Celsius and then re-oxidized with steam at lower temperatures to produce hydrogen.

Researchers develop perovskite-based multifunctional logic gates

Researchers at KIST and Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), led by Dr. Yusin Pak at the Sensor System Research Center (KIST) and Professor Gun Young Jung at the School of Materials Science and Engineering (GIST), have developed ultra-high-speed, high-efficiency optoelectronic logic gates (OELGs) by using organic-inorganic perovskite photodiodes.

Demand is increasing for computers that can quickly calculate and process large amounts of information, as artificial intelligence, self-driving cars, drones, and metaverse technologies are drawing attention as core industries of the future. However, electronic semiconductor logic gates, which serve as the brains of computers, have limited capacity in high-speed data calculation and processing, and have disadvantages in that they consume a lot of energy and generate considerable heat.

Researchers use a 2D perovskite passivation layer as an electron blocking layer in 18.5%-efficient carbon-electrode perovskite solar cell

Researchers from Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems ISE, EPFL, Korea Basic Science Institute (KBSI) and Morocco's Abdelmalek Essaadi University have developed a perovskite solar cell with a carbon electrode that achieved 18.5% efficiency.

Electron blocking for 18.5%-efficient carbon-electrode perovskite solar cell imageSchematic diagram of the investigated low-temperature carbon electrode-based PSC with 3D/2D perovskite treated by OAI. Image from study

The solar cell also reportedly retained 82% of their efficiency after 500 hours of continuous illumination. The cell is produced via all low-temperature processes that could likely be scaled into low-cost, large-scale manufacturing – making the approach attractive despite achieving lower efficiency than record-setting cells.