Researchers design new method to achieve directional polarized light emission from thin‐film LEDs

Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Texas have developed and demonstrated a new approach for designing photonic devices. The new method enabled the team to control the direction and polarization of light from thin-film LEDs, overcoming the widely known obstacles of beam shaping that arise from their Lambertian nature. Such LEDs with directional and polarized light emission could be useful for many photonic applications.

A new approach for designing photonic devices with directional light emission image

“This is a fundamentally new device architecture for photonic devices,” says Franky So, corresponding author of a paper describing the work and Professor of Materials Science and Engineering at NC State. “And we’ve demonstrated that, using our approach, directional and polarized emissions from an organic LED or a perovskite LED without external optical elements can be realized”.

Metallic line defects in perovskites could open the door to next-gen smart windows and displays

A research team, led by University of Minnesota Professor K. Andre Mkhoyan, has made a discovery that blends the best of two sought-after qualities for touchscreens and smart windows—transparency and conductivity.

Metallic line defect in wide-bandgap transparent perovskite BaSnO3 imageThe atomic arrangement of both the BaSnO3 crystal and the metallic line defect. Image credit UMN

The researchers have observed metallic lines in a perovskite crystal. Perovskites are abundant in the Earth’s center, and barium stannate (BaSnO3) is one such crystal. However, it has not been studied extensively for metallic properties because of the prevalence of more conductive materials like metals or semiconductors. The finding was made using advanced transmission electron microscopy (TEM), a technique that can form images with magnifications of up to 10 million.

TCL and Zhijing Nanotech collaborate on pQD solutions for LCD TVs

China-based Zhijing Nanotech develops perovskite-QD film (PQDF) technologies for the display industry, and the company demonstrated its first prototypes in 2018.

TCL 75M10 TV with Zhijing Nanotech's perovskite film photo
Perovskite-Info has talked with the company's management, which updated us that it recently concluded a successful pilot with TCL. TCL, in collaboration with Zhijing Nanotech, produced 500 75-inch QD-enhanced LCD TVs (TCL 4K 75M10) with Zhijing's PQDF films. The company reports that the TVs featured a wide color gamut, 147% BT709 - which is higher than most QD TV's on the market, and higher than TCL's original 75M10 TVs.

New! Don't miss the Perovskite for the Display Industry Market Report

Perovskite-Info is proud to present our first market report, The Perovskite for the Display Industry Market Report. This market report, brought to you by the world's leading perovskite and OLED industry experts, is a comprehensive guide to next-generation perovskite-based solutions for the display industry that enable efficient, low cost and high-quality display devices.

Reading this report, you'll learn all about:

  • Perovskite materials and their properties
  • Perovskite applications in the display industry
  • Perovskite QDs for color conversion
  • Prominent perovskite display related research activities

The report also provides a list of perovskite display companies, datasheets and brochures of pQD film solutions, an introduction to perovskite materials and processes, an introduction to emerging display technologies and more.

Quantum Solutions demonstrates its green perovskite QD film for LCD color conversion

UK-based Quantum Solutions published this video below that demonstrates its latest perovskite QD film for LCD color conversion:

Quantum Solutions now offers its QDot SharpGreen Perovskite QDs Film, which is a polymer composite with embedded QDot SharpGreen Perovskite QDs. It is designed to be used in LCD backlighting units and sensor devices for X-rays and UV lights. The material has green emission 520-535 nm (depending on the concentration), high PLQY (up to 80-100 %) and narrow FWHM (< 20-22 nm). The company says that the films retain > 70-80 % of initial photoluminescence within 1000 hours of exposing by heat (85 °C and blue light 10 mW/cm2 exposure) and high relative humidity (90 % RH at 60 °C).