Silver-based perovskites with anti-microbial properties could be useful in tissue engineering

A new study, led by Dr. Shayanti Mukherjee at the Australian Hudson Institute (a leading Australian translational medical research institute), has found that perovskites materials can have anti-microbial properties, without toxic side effects to human cells.

Perovkites may close the gap in tissue engineering image(A) process of perovskite synthesis; (B) preparation of electrospinning solution with perovskite. Image from Nanomaterials

Dr Mukherjee and her team, who already have a significant program researching new bio-degradable nanomeshes to revolutionize treatments for pelvic organ prolapse (POP), have shown for the first time that perovskites can be used as additives to engineer human tissue implants.

Peppermint oil and walnut aroma to enable HT material that prevents lead leakage in perovskite solar cells

Researchers at the Pohang University of Science & Technology (POSTECH) have developed eco-friendly-solvent processable hole transport polymers by using peppermint oil and walnut aroma food additives and the polymer can prevent lead leakage.

The POSTECH research team consisted of Prof. Taiho Park and Junwoo Lee, that developed Alkoxy-PTEG - hole transport polymers that could be dissolved in peppermint oil, by applying ethylene glycol side chains when producing perovskite solar cells. Also, the team confirmed that this polymer captured leaking lead in aging perovskite solar cells.

New lead sequestration technique could make for safer lead-based perovskite solar cells

Researchers at Northern Illinois University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Colorado have reported on a potential breakthrough in the development of hybrid perovskite solar cells.

Led by Tao Xu of NIU and Kai Zhu of NREL, the scientists have developed a technique to sequester the lead used to make perovskite solar cells and minimize potential toxic leakage by applying lead-absorbing films to the front and back of the solar cell.

HZB-led team finds that plants absorb more lead from perovskite solar cells than expected

Researchers led by Prof. Antonio Abate at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin have designed a study to investigate lead hazards relating to perovskite soar cells. They cooperated with plant scientists from the Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, China, where the experiments were carried out, and with a group from the university of Naples, Italy.

Comparison of mint plants grown on control and PSC soils imageMint plants grown on control soil (left) and perovskite-contaminated soil (right). Credit: Nature

The plant experts prepared contaminated soil samples with different concentrations of lead from either perovskite solar cells or other lead sources and cultivated different plants. After a growth period, they analyzed the lead content in leaves and other parts of the plant. They found that lead from perovskite solar cells is 10 times more bioavailable than lead from other industrial sources.

Chalcogenide perovksites found promising for PV and waste heat recovery

Researchers from Lehigh University in Pennsylvania have found that metal chalcogenide perovskites can be used as a thermoelectric material that can convert thermal energy from the sun to usable electric power.

Metal chalcogenide perovskites, with their nontoxic elemental composition, are known to offer greater thermal and aqueous stability than organic-inorganic halide perovskites. This means that they may be more suitable than other materials in the perovskite family to address the two biggest issues in commercial solar cell production: low thermal stability and toxicity.