Advanced method finds that lead halide perovskites are not ferroelectric

Researchers at the Institute of Materials Science in Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC) and the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie (Germany) have used a unique microscopy technique to demonstrate that perovskites are not ferroelectric, as was thought.

The new technique, patented by CSIC in 2017, is the direct piezoelectric force microscopy (DPFM) which, for the first time, is used in lead halide perovskite solar cells.

KAUST team pushes PSCs forward by generating homogeneous and defect-free perovskite crystals

KAUST researchers have developed a synthetic approach that generates homogeneous and defect-free crystals that have the potential to fast-track the commercialization of perovskite solar cells.

KAUST team may advance PSCs with single crystal perovskites image

The performance and stability of solar cells depend on the morphology of the perovskite thin films, which act as light-harvesting layers in the devices. A major problem arises from the fact that existing perovskite solar cells usually consist of polycrystalline thin films that are highly disordered and defective, which prevents devices from achieving optimal performance.

CSoT demonstrates a 6.6" 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots for color conversion

China-based display maker China Star (CSoT, a subsidiary of TCL) demonstrated a 6.6-inch 384x300 OLED display that uses perovskite quantum dots as a color conversion film.

CSoT is using blue OLED emitter materials, and a perovskite layer to up-convert the color to green (this is a monochrome prototype - evidently a very early prototype). CSoT brands its perovskite-OLEDs as PE-OLED and we believe this is the first time a perovskite-enhanced display has been publicly demonstrated.

Oxford PV closes £65 million funding round

Oxford PV recently announced it has closed its Series D funding round. An additional £34 million, following the £31 million first close, brings the funding round total to £65 million.

The first close, announced in March 2019, included a significant new investment from Goldwind, the leading provider of integrated renewable energy solutions in China, as well as investment from existing shareholders including Equinor and Legal & General Capital. The additional funds include the major new investment from Meyer Burger, the leading photovoltaic equipment supplier, announced in March 2019, with the remaining investment coming from other new and existing investors.

Researchers use perovskite absorbers to utilize infrared light in solar cells

Researchers from Florida State University and Georgia Tech have been working on new ways for solar cells to absorb and use infrared light, a portion of the solar spectrum that is typically unavailable for solar cell technology.

“We’re working on a process to optimize the efficiency of solar cells,” said Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry Lea Nienhaus. “The main drive is to optimize this process for solar applications”. The team has created a new approach for solar cells to facilitate a process called photon upconversion. In photon upconversion, two low energy photons are converted into one high-energy photon that emits visible light.

Surrey team demonstrates promising perovskite solar cells with half the amount of lead

Researchers from the University of Surrey’s Advanced Technology Institute (ATI) have produced a perovskite solar cell which contains 50% less lead, replaced with the more innocuous tin. By fine-tuning their tin solar cell, the researchers were able to create a product that is able to absorb infrared light in a similar manner as silicon cells. They also found that by stacking lead-only cells with the ones mixed with tin can lead to power conversion results that outperform those of silicon-only power cells.

Indrachapa Bandara, lead author of the study and PhD student at ATI, said: “We are starting to see that many countries are treating the threat of climate change with the seriousness it deserves. If we are to get a handle on the problem and put the health of our planet on the right track, we need high-performing renewable energy solutions.... Our study has shown that tin based perovskite solar cells have an incredible amount of potential and could help countries such as the United Kingdom reach its target of becoming carbon neutral by 2050”.

Researchers explain green light emission from 2D lead halide perovskites

An international research team led by the University of Houston researchers have tackled a lingering question about how a two-dimensional perovskite crystal composed of cesium, lead and bromine emits a strong green light. Crystals that produce light on the green spectrum are desirable because green light, while valuable in itself, can also be relatively easily converted to other forms that emit blue or red light, making it especially important for optical applications ranging from light-emitting devices to sensitive diagnostic tools.

There was, however, confusion as to how the crystal, CsPB2Br5, produced the green photoluminescence. Several theories emerged, without a definitive answer. Now, the researcher team from the United States, Mexico and China, led by the University of Houston, have reported that they have used sophisticated optical and high-pressure diamond anvil cell techniques to determine not only the mechanism for the light emission but also how to replicate it.