Perovskite Solar

What are perovskite?

Perovskites are a class of materials that share a similar structure, which display a myriad of exciting properties like superconductivity, magnetoresistance and more. These easily synthesized materials are considered the future of solar cells, as their distinctive structure makes them perfect for enabling low-cost, efficient photovoltaics. They are also predicted to play a role in next-gen electric vehicle batteries, sensors, lasers and much more.

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How does the PV market look today?

In general, Photovoltaic (PV) technologies can be viewed as divided into two main categories: wafer-based PV (also called 1st generation PVs) and thin-film cell PVs. Traditional crystalline silicon (c-Si) cells (both single crystalline silicon and multi-crystalline silicon) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) cells belong to the wafer-based PVs, with c-Si cells dominating the current PV market (about 90% market share) and GaAs exhibiting the highest efficiency.

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Thin-film cells normally absorb light more efficiently than silicon, allowing the use of extremely thin films. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) technology has been successfully commercialized, with more than 20% cell efficiency and 17.5% module efficiency record and such cells currently hold about 5% of the total market. Other commercial thin-film technologies include hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) and copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) cells, taking approximately 2% market share each today. Copper zinc tin sulphide technology has been under R&D for years and will probably require some time until actual commercialization.

What is a perovskite solar cell?

An emerging thin-film PV class is being formed, also called 3rd generation PVs, which refers to PVs using technologies that have the potential to overcome current efficiency and performance limits or are based on novel materials. This 3rd generation of PVs includes DSSC, organic photovoltaic (OPV), quantum dot (QD) PV and perovskite PV.

A perovskite solar cell is a type of solar cell which includes a perovskite structured compound, most commonly a hybrid organic-inorganic lead or tin halide-based material, as the light-harvesting active layer. Perovskite materials such as methylammonium lead halides are cheap to produce and relatively simple to manufacture. Perovskites possess intrinsic properties like broad absorption spectrum, fast charge separation, long transport distance of electrons and holes, long carrier separation lifetime, and more, that make them very promising materials for solid-state solar cells.

Perovskite-solar-cell

Perovskite solar cells are, without a doubt, the rising star in the field of photovoltaics. They are causing excitement within the solar power industry with their ability to absorb light across almost all visible wavelengths, exceptional power conversion efficiencies already exceeding 20% in the lab, and relative ease of fabrication. Perovskite solar cells still face several challenge, but much work is put into facing them and some companies, are already talking about commercializing them in the near future.



What are the advantages of Perovskite solar cells?

Put simply, perovskite solar cells aim to increase the efficiency and lower the cost of solar energy. Perovskite PVs indeed hold promise for high efficiencies, as well as low potential material & reduced processing costs. A big advantage perovskite PVs have over conventional solar technology is that they can react to various different wavelengths of light, which lets them convert more of the sunlight that reaches them into electricity.

Moreover, they offer flexibility, semi-transparency, tailored form factors, light-weight and more. Naturally, electronics designers and researchers are certain that such characteristics will open up many more applications for solar cells.

What is holding perovskite PVs back?

Despite its great potential, perovskite solar cell technology is still in the early stages of commercialization compared with other mature solar technologies as there are a number of concerns remaining.

One problem is their overall cost (for several reasons, mainly since currently the most common electrode material in perovskite solar cells is gold), and another is that cheaper perovskite solar cells have a short lifespan. Perovskite PVs also deteriorate rapidly in the presence of moisture and the decay products attack metal electrodes. Heavy encapsulation to protect perovskite can add to the cell cost and weight. Scaling up is another issue - reported high efficiency ratings have been achieved using small cells, which is great for lab testing, but too small to be used in an actual solar panel.

A major issue is toxicity - a substance called PbI is one of the breakdown products of perovskite. This is known to be toxic and there are concerns that it may be carcinogenic (although this is still an unproven point). Also, many perovskite cells use lead, a massive pollutant. Researchers are constantly seeking substitutions, and have already made working cells using tin instead. (with efficiency at only 6%, but improvements will surely follow).

What’s next?

While major challenges indeed exist, perovskite solar cells are still touted as the PV technology of the future, and much development work and research are put into making this a reality. Scientists and companies are working towards increasing efficiency and stability, prolonging lifetime and replacing toxic materials with safer ones. Researchers are also looking at the benefits of combining perovskites with other technologies, like silicon for example, to create what is referred to as “tandem cells”.

Commercial activity in the field of perovskite PV

In September 2015, Australia-based organic PV and perovskite solar cell (PSC) developer Dyesol declared a major breakthrough in perovskite stability for solar applications. Dyesol claims to have made a significant breakthrough on small perovskite solar cells, with “meaningful numbers” of 10% efficient strip cells exhibiting less than 10% relative degradation when exposed to continuous light soaking for over 1000 hours. Dyesol was also awarded a $0.5 million grant from the Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) to commercialize an innovative, very high efficiency perovskite solar cell.

Also in 2015, Saule Technologies signed an investment deal with Hideo Sawada, a Japanese investment company. Saule aims to combine perovskite solar cells with other currently available products, and this investment agreement came only a year after the company was launched.

In October 2020, Saule launched sunbreaker lamellas equipped with perovskite solar cells. The product is planned to soon be marketed across across Europe and potentially go global after that.

In August 2020, reports out of China suggested that a perovskite photovoltaic cell production line has gone into production in Quzhou, east China's Zhejiang Province. The 40-hectare factory was reportedly funded by Microquanta Semiconductor and expected to produce more than 200,000 square meters of photovoltaic glass before the end of 2020.

In September 2020, Oxford PV's Professor Henry Snaith stated that the Company's perovskite-based solar cells are scheduled to go on sale next year, probably by mid 2021. These will be perovskite solar cells integrated with standard silicon solar cells.

 

The latest perovskite solar news:

New project will utilize quantum computing to advance perovskite PV materials

A UK-based quantum software company called Phasecraft will lead a project modelling new perovskite-silicon materials for solar photovoltaics. The project, in collaboration with Oxford PV and scientists at University College London (UCL), is aimed to support the development of quantum computing to simulate “currently intractable problems” in PV materials modelling, according to a recent statement.

Not many details were given regarding the new project, which received an award from UK Research and Innovation’s Commercializing Quantum Technologies Challenge. It was, however, said that it will set out to develop a modelling capability that is tailored to the real-world needs of the PV industry.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 06,2022

New battery-solar cell design could charge wearable in seconds

Researchers from the University of Surrey's Advanced Technology Institute (ATI), KIOS Research and Innovation Center of Excellence at the University of Cyprus, China's Zhengzhou University, and the UK's National Physical Laboratory (NPL) have demonstrated a new photo-rechargeable system, which merges zinc-ion batteries with perovskite solar cells.

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New prototype battery needs seconds of sunlight to keep wearables charged

(a) device configuration and (b) working principle of the integrated flexible photo-rechargeable system. Credit: Energy Storage Materials

The new system could allow wearables to charge without the need to plug in. In fact, as little as thirty seconds of sunlight could boost the battery life of future smartwatches and other wearables by tens of minutes. The new environmentally friendly, photo-rechargeable system is unique because of its elegant design between the integrated battery and solar cell, allowing it to demonstrate high energy and volume density comparable to state-of-the-art micro-batteries and supercapacitors. 

Read the full story Posted: Aug 04,2022

Researchers use Polyaniline for improved perovskite solar cells

Scientists from Syracuse University, South Dakota State University and Huzhou University have examined the use of polyaniline as a material for improved perovskite solar cells. The team demonstrated a facile, low-cost fabrication route for polyaniline hole transport mechanisms that display enhanced power conversion efficiency compared to conventional PEDOT:PSS hole transport layers in perovskites. This could provide a route toward low-cost, high-efficiency perovskite solar cells.

PEDOT:PSS is a commonly used material in perovskites, used as a hole transport layer between the photoactive perovskite layer and indium tin oxide layer. Using PEDOT:PSS improves the power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells. However, several issues have been observed with PEDOT:PSS. One of the fundamental issues is the degradation of active layers and defect formation associated with the large particle size of this material. Moreover, the use of this material as a hole transport layer is hindered by issues with low electrical conductivity limits and cost.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 02,2022

2D perovskite passivation layer for efficient and stable perovskite solar cells

Researchers from Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Wuhan University of Technology and Foshan Xianhu Laboratory of the Advanced Energy Science and Technology Guangdong Laboratory have announced their success in manufacturing a high-efficiency, stable perovskite solar cell through a vacuum thin film deposition process.

Vacuum thin film deposition is a technique that is already widely used in the manufacture of large OLED TVs by evaporating raw materials in a vacuum and coating them thinly on a substrate. The perovskite solar cell developed this way displayed a photovoltaic-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 21.4%, which the team said is the highest among perovskite solar cells manufactured by vacuum thin film deposition process.

Read the full story Posted: Aug 01,2022

UNSW team outlines the threat that reverse-bias poses to perovskite solar cells

University of New South Wales (UNSW) team, led by renowned PV scientist Martin Green, have shown that perovskite solar cells may be especially susceptible to damage from reverse bias, caused by uneven shading or other issues that may appear in real-world environments. Both the reverse-bias itself and resulting build up of heat can cause several of the materials commonly used in perovskite solar cells to degrade, and these issues have received only limited attention in research published thus far. 

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Combatting temperature and reverse-bias challenges facing perovskite solar cells image

Stability issues with perovskite solar cells linger, despite impressive research achievements in the last few years. Much of the research focused on improving stability to date has focused on the issues that arise under normal operating conditions – for example sensitivity to oxygen and moisture, which can be solved through encapsulation, or degradation under UV light, which can be solved with reflective coatings. Other issues, however, may present serious challenges to developing perovskite devices that can function in outdoor conditions for years and even decades. “…thermal degradation and reverse-bias instability are remaining issues that pose challenges even for intrinsically much more stable silicon cells, suggesting that innovative approaches may be required to satisfactorily address these for perovskite cells”, explain the authors of the new paper.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 31,2022

Surface redox engineering approach enables high-performance large-area perovskite submodules

Researchers led by Prof. LIU Shengzhong from the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics (DICP) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) have developed a facile surface redox engineering (SRE) strategy for vacuum-deposited NiOx to match the slot-die-coated perovskite, and fabricated high-performance large-area perovskite submodules.

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Surface redox engineering of vacuum-deposited NiOx for top-performance perovskite solar cells and modules image

Inverted PSCs could be even more valuable than their normal counterparts because the former have easily-mitigated hysteresis behavior and long-term durability. NiOx has been demonstrated as a promising hole transport material for inverted PSCs. But for most vacuum-processed NiOx films, the relatively hydrophobic surface attenuates the adhesion of perovskite ink, making it challenging to deposit large-area perovskite films.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 29,2022

Researchers design graphene oxide/silicon heterojunction solar cell with 18.8% efficiency

Researchers from Hebei University, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and Chinese module manufacturer Yingli Green Energy Holding Co. Ltd. have reported a heterojunction solar cell based on graphene-oxide (GO) and silicon with a large area of 5.5 cm2.

GO is a compound of carbon, oxygen and hydrogen that is obtained by treating graphite with oxidizers and acids. It consists of a single-layer sheet of graphite oxide that is commonly used to produce graphene-related nanomaterials for various applications, including electronics, optics, chemistry and more. The scientists developed an ink made of GO mixed with Nafion, that can be spin-coated on an n-type silicon wafer to form a high-quality passivating contact scheme. “Low interface recombination is provided by the Nafion and carrier selection by the GO,” the team explained, noting that the passivation scheme also includes an electron-selective passivation contact comprising n-doped hydrogenated amorphous silicon with an indium tin oxide (ITO) overlayer aimed at improving light trapping and reducing surface recombination.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 28,2022

Novel lamination process enables 20% efficiency of monolithic perovskite-silicon tandem cells

Researchers from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) and the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH in Germany have developed a monolithic perovskite-silicon solar cell with a power conversion efficiency of 20%, using a novel lamination approach.

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The lamination process and device architecture of the laminated monolithic perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells

The team investigated how this lamination process can be applied to perovskite/silicon tandem technology. They explained that the solar cells are the first prototypes and that lamination is a suitable alternative fabrication method for monolithic perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells. The lamination approach, they said, is particularly interesting for perovskite-based PV, as it notably increases the degree of freedom in the choice of materials and accessible deposition techniques.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 25,2022

Researchers achieve 18.4% efficiency for 4T flexible perovskite-CIGS tandem mini-module

Researchers from Switzerland's Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (EMPA) and École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) have designed a four-terminal tandem mini-module based on perovskite and copper, indium, gallium and selenium (CIGS) with an aperture area of around 2 cm2, and a geometric fill factor of over 93%.

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Processing sequence of flexible NIR-transparent perovskite mini-module

Processing sequence of flexible NIR-transparent perovskite mini-module. Image from RRL Solar

The team reports that the key to efficient flexible perovskite-CIGS tandem modules is the development of near-infrared (NIR) transparent perovskite solar modules on a flexible polymer foil. To achieve these results, the researchers had to overcome the challenges of laser patterning on flexible substrates to realize the first all-laser scribed monolithically interconnected NIR-transparent perovskite mini-modules on polymer film. The perovskite mini-module used in the tandem panel was fabricated on a flexible polyethylene napthalathe (PEN) substrate mounted to a glass substrate in a p–i–n device architecture. This configuration, according to the research team, shows reduced absorption in the NIR region.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 23,2022

Researchers reach 16.5% efficiency with p-i-n perovskite solar cell on steel substrate

Researchers from the Eindhoven University of Technology, the Netherlands Organization for Applied Scientific Research (TNO), and Indian steel manufacturer Tata Steel recently fabricated an inverted perovskite solar cell based on a polymer-coated steel substrate that can achieve a power conversion efficiency approaching that of non-inverted reference solar cells with a similar stack design.

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p–i–n Perovskite Solar Cells on Steel Substrates image

Substrate (A and B) and superstrate (C) p–i–n solar cells on glass (A and C) and steel (B). Image from ACS Publication study

The cell has a p-i-n structure and relies on nickel-plated steel coated with a polyamide-imide (PAI) planarization layer, which serves as an insulating layer. The researchers used an opaque titanium electrode covered with a thin sputtered indium tin oxide (ITO) layer to enable the binding of the phosphonic acid anchoring groups of the monolayer based on a perovskite known as 2PACz, which serves as a hole-collecting electrode.

Read the full story Posted: Jul 20,2022