Graphene "shield" improves the stability of perovskite solar cells

A UNIST research team has developed an electrode that can significantly improve the stability of perovskite solar cells. UNIST announced that its research team developed “flexible and transparent metal electrode-based perovskite solar cells with a graphene interlayer”.Performance and stability of transparent metal electrode-based perovskite solar cells image

The team suppressed interdiffusion and degradation using a graphene material with high impermeability, the team said. Team leader professor Hyesung Park commented that the research will greatly help not only solar cells but other perovskite-based flexible photoelectric devices such as LEDs and smart sensors.

Researchers develop halide double perovskite ferroelectrics

A research group led by Prof. Luo Junhua from Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter (FJIRSM) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences reported the first halide double perovskite ferroelectric, (n-propylammonium)2CsAgBiBr7, which exhibits distinct ferroelectricity with a notable saturation polarization of about 1.5 μCcm-2.

Halide double perovskites have been found to be a promising environmentally friendly optoelectronic and photovoltaic material, exhibiting inherent thermodynamic stability, high defect tolerance and appropriate band gaps. However, no ferroelectric material based on halide double perovskites has been discovered until now.

Perovskite/graphene nanosensor detects nitrogen dioxide with 300% improved sensitivity

A research team led by Juan Casanova and Eduard Llobet from the Departamento de Ingeniería Electrónica, Eléctrica y Automática at the Universitat Politècnica de València (URV), used graphene and perovskites to create a nanosensor that detects nitrogen dioxide with 300% improved sensitivity.

The team used graphene that is hydrophobic (water and moisture-resistant) and sensitive in gas detection, but with some limitations: it is not very selective and its sensitivity declines over time. In addition, the researchers used perovskites, a crystalline-structure material commonly used in the field of solar cells. However, they quickly deteriorate when they are exposed to the atmosphere. That's the reason why the team decided to combine perovskites with a hydrophobic material able to repel water molecules - in order to prove they can prevent or slow down their deterioration.

Perovskite X-Ray detectors could revolutionize imaging for medicine, security And research

Researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have designed a new perovskite-based X-ray detector prototype that might revolutionize medical imaging, with dramatic reduction in radiation exposure and the associated health risks, while also boosting resolution in security scanners and research applications.

X-ray detectors made with 2-dimensional perovskite thin films convert X-ray photons to electrical signals image

“The perovskite material at the heart of our detector prototype can be produced with low-cost fabrication techniques,” said Hsinhan (Dave) Tsai, an Oppenheimer Postdoctoral fellow at Los Alamos National Laboratory. “The result is a cost-effective, highly sensitive, and self-powered detector that could radically improve existing X-ray detectors, and potentially lead to a host of unforeseen applications.”

Perovskite diodes enable bidirectional optical signal transmission between two identical devices

Researchers at Linköping University, in collaboration with colleagues in China, have developed a tiny unit that is both an optical transmitter and a receiver. "This is highly significant for the miniaturization of optoelectronic systems," says LiU professor Feng Gao.

Chunxiong Bao, postdoc at Linköping University, types in a sentence on a computer screen, and the same sentence immediately appears on the neighboring screen, optically transferred from one diode to another. The diode is made from perovskite.