Saule Technologies is a Polish start-up that designed a low-temperature method for manufacturing flexible photovoltaic perovskite cells. The company is working on the development of a flexible and semi-transparent cell based on PET foil.

Saule's aim is to combine perovskite solar cells with other currently available products.

In December 2018, The Henn-na Hotel in Japan, a technologically advanced hotel staffed by robots, installed perovskite solar technology developed by Saule Technologies. The installed commercial prototype is made of 72 perovskite modules encapsulated in curved glass. Also in December 2018, Saule Technologies announced that Skanska has gone through with the installation of the first big format perovskite solar panel provided by Saule Technologies, integrated into its office in Warsaw, Poland. The size of the solar panel being tested on Skanska's Spark office building is 1.3 x 0.9 meters, containing 52 photovoltaic modules.

Saule Technologies has been working on the application of ink-jet printing for fabricating free-form perovskite solar modules since 2014. This technique allows the shapes and areas covered by each layer to be customized according to requirements. The stability and water resistance of the modules make them ideal for the construction industry. The company has conducted advanced research on perovskite applications in solar energy harvesting and optoelectronics with leading international universities in the UK, Israel, Germany, Italy and Spain. With a Japanese investor on board, along with support from the Polish National Centre for Research and Development and several research grants worth more than EUR 20 million, Saule Technologies is working on a large-scale, prototype production line.

In December 2014 in Boston, Saule Technologies unveiled the world's first printed perovskite.



Company Address: 
14B Postepu Str.
02-676 Warsaw
Poland

The latest Saule Technologies news:

Project ESPResSo will receive EU funding to bring PSCs out of the lab and into the market

Imec, the leading research hub focused on nanoelectronics, energy and digital technologies and partner in EnergyVille, has been named the coordinator of an ambitious 3-year European Union (EU) funded project called "ESPResSo" (Efficient Structures and Processes for Reliable Perovskite Solar Modules), that gathers known leaders in the field of perovskite PV technology to revolutionize Europe's photovoltaics (PV) industry.

Projject ESPResSo for perovskite solar cells image

The ESPResSo consortium has been granted over 5 Million by the European Union to overcome the limitations of today's state-of-the-art perovskite PV technology, bring perovskite solar cells to the next maturity level, and demonstrate their practical application.

Saule Technologies' perovskite-based solar panels headed for commercial implementation by building company Skanska

Saule Technologies, Poland-based developer of perovskite solar cells ink-jet printed on thin foil, has announced the signing of a cooperation agreement with Skanska's commercial development business unit in Central Eastern Europe.

Saule Technologies' flexible panels image

The construction company will be the first to cover office buildings with semi-transparent perovskite solar cells on a commercial scale. Saule Technologies will be the technology provider. The initial implementation tests are planned for 2018 in Poland.

Saule Technologies to demonstrate A4-paper-sized, flexible, printed perovskite solar cells

Saule Technologies will be presenting a flexible, printed, perovskite photovoltaic module the size of an A4 sheet of paper, for the first time, at the IDTechEx Show on November 15-16th in Santa Clara, CA. The operating Saule module is printed on an ultrathin plastic foil able to charge personal electronic devices, demonstrating one of the many possible applications of these perovskite solar cells. The prototype industry-scale production line is estimated to begin in 2018.

Saule Technologies' flexible perovskite module image

"Scaling up the size of perovskite solar cells is one of the biggest challenges for companies and researchers working with this technology. Printing a stable and operating A4 size module has been among our most important milestones for 2017 and we are more than happy to be able to present it for the first time in the USA," says the CTO and co-founder at Saule Technologies.

Saule Technologies presents breakthrough perovskite solar prototype at PSCO 2017

Saule Technologies has announced that it will be presenting a prototype and will answer questions regarding its flexible perovskite photovoltaic modules at the 3rd International Conference on Perovskite Solar Cells and Optoelectronics (PSCO-2017) in Oxford, UK.

Saule Technologies' flexible perovskite module image

The company will reportedly be showing an operating module printed on ultra-thin PET foil. Samples available for public viewing will present the stability of the module and underwater operation for the first time. The prototype large-scale production line capable of fabricating solar modules with a nominal power output of 100W/m2 is expected to be operational in fall of 2018.

Imperial College team investigates the source of perovskite PVs performance issues

Scientists at Imperial College London have conducted experiments to follow the direction in which electrons move in perovskite solar cells when they are generated with a short pulse of light. They found that the mobile charged defects are still present even in solar cells with very efficient contact materials, despite these cells showing no hysteresis. Hysteresis was only found when cells suffered the combined effects of both the defects and poor selectivity at the contacts.

perovskite films contain charged defects that tend to impair their performance. Slow movement of these defects is thought to be responsible for a process known as hysteresis, which leads to irregularities in the efficiency with which light is converted to electrical current. Light-generated electricity exits the solar cell in the form of electrons to be harnessed. This is done via ‘contacts’ that sandwich the light-absorbing film. Previously, scientists have managed to address hysteresis by using more ‘selective’ contact materials that ensure a one-way flow of electrons out of the solar cell.

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