Quantum Solutions demonstrates its green perovskite QD film for LCD color conversion

UK-based Quantum Solutions published this video below that demonstrates its latest perovskite QD film for LCD color conversion:

Quantum Solutions now offers its QDot SharpGreen Perovskite QDs Film, which is a polymer composite with embedded QDot SharpGreen Perovskite QDs. It is designed to be used in LCD backlighting units and sensor devices for X-rays and UV lights. The material has green emission 520-535 nm (depending on the concentration), high PLQY (up to 80-100 %) and narrow FWHM (< 20-22 nm). The company says that the films retain > 70-80 % of initial photoluminescence within 1000 hours of exposing by heat (85 °C and blue light 10 mW/cm2 exposure) and high relative humidity (90 % RH at 60 °C).

Stanford team designs ultrafast way to manufacture perovskite solar modules

A research team at Stanford University has designed a new perovskite manufacturing process. In their work, the team demonstrated an ultrafast way to produce stable perovskite cells and assemble them into solar modules that could power devices, buildings and even the electricity grid.

“This work provides a new milestone for perovskite manufacturing,” said study senior author Reinhold Dauskardt, the Ruth G. and William K. Bowes Professor in the Stanford School of Engineering. “It resolves some of the most formidable barriers to module-scale manufacturing that the community has been dealing with for years.”

Perovskite QD films get closer to market - Avantama qualifies its green pQD display film

An exciting application for perovskite QDs, which is likely to be the first commercial adoption of pQDs, is for the display market - films that convert blue LED LCD backlight to green.

Switzerland-based nanomaterial developer Avantama told us that the company passed the OEM qualification with its green pQD film, together with a KSF phosphor solution on the LED chip. Avantama expects the first commercial LCD display to adopt this solution to hit the market in 2021.

Researchers create a perovskite-based nickel oxide material that shows signs of superconductivity

Researchers at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University have created a nickel oxide material that shows signs of superconductivity.

Also known as a nickelate, it’s the first in a potential new family of unconventional superconductors that’s very similar to the copper oxides, or cuprates, whose discovery in 1986 raised hopes that superconductors could someday operate at close to room temperature and revolutionize electronic devices, power transmission and other technologies. Those similarities make scientists wonder if nickelates could also superconduct at relatively high temperatures.